#22: Have Silks, Will Travel … to the Nearest Tree!

While I prefer to rig the silks on the boat, the conditions don’t always allow it.  Good news is, though, all you need is a backpack and a tree!  Let’s go!

Thanks to my Patrons who help me share the journey.  Get inspired.  Get on board.

Pat4

This entry was posted in Aerial Silks, Videos and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to #22: Have Silks, Will Travel … to the Nearest Tree!

  1. Byn Always says:

    Whoo Hoo! Fantastic! I’m going to share this with my aerialist kids 🙂 Thanks for posting, you’re doing amazing things and inspiring people all over!

  2. mauimedusa says:

    Hi! Love your page and video!! I’m trying to rig my silk up to a tree, what kind of string (?) did you attach to your carabiner when you threw it over? i just got a spanset but am having trouble getting it up there, thanks for any info you have!!

    • anniedike says:

      Hey there! So glad you enjoyed the video. Check out the comments on YouTube as there was a lot of back and forth there about how to rig it up. Here’s one: “Hey Jennifer! It sounds like YOU’RE the one who’s all tangled up. Ha! I’m imagining you in a big wad of AmSteel. Funny. No problem at all. I’m happy to help. I have two AmSteel lines, both about 50 feet long, both tied to the caribbeaner that attaches to the swivel which attaches to the Rescue 8. I throw (usually the caribbeaner) over the limb with the two AmSteels attached. (And, I only have two just for added measure, I’ve silken with one many times and never had a worry.) Once over the limb, I attach the silks and hoist and then start wrapping around the tree, like you said, approximately four times. So once over the limb, then start going around the tree. It’s actually the multiple wraps that holds the weight (that way the knot doesn’t do most of that or you’ll never get it undone). Then after wrapping, I come back the line that is headed up to the limb and tie the end of the Amsteel to that, just a regular around-and-through knot, about four or five in a row. Then you’re ready to silk. I usually like to pull on the silks hard, lift my weight off the ground and bounce a couple of times first just to get everything to settle, but that’s all. AmSteel is really strong stuff. Your main worry is chafe over the tree limb. I’m thinking about running the AmSteel through a piece of hose next time to prevent that, but keep an eye on it and flip the Amsteel around if you start to see chafe near the end tied to the caribbeaner. Good luck hanging and silking with your daughter. Please share pics if you get her up there. I love to see others out there silking!!”

  3. Beth says:

    Annie – Can you please recommend some silks … I would like to purchase some – but there are so many out there.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s